Gender and contextual factors in adolescent dating violence

posted by | Leave a comment

While dating, domestic and sexual violence affect women regardless of their age, teens and young women are especially vulnerable.

Young people ages 12 to 19 experience the highest rates of rape and sexual assault, and people age 18 and 19 experience the highest rates of stalking.

In some cases, the adult may be just a few months older than the minor.

There are a number of states in which "age of consent statutes are used to prosecute consensual sex between two persons both under the age of consent." This type of prosecution has been deemed unconstitutional in some states by citing violation of privacy rights, but remains in effect in other states.

It is important to note that although male and female adolescents do not differ in "overall frequency of violence in dating relationships," females are subject to "significantly higher levels of severe violence".

This fact begs the question of whether abuse should be evaluated based on “severity” and how that can and should be measured, or if all abuse should be considered equally harmful.

Google Scholar Crossref Silverman JG, Raj A, Mucci LA, Hathaway JE. Pub Med Google Scholar Crossref Lormand DK, Markham CM, Peskin MF, et al. Pub Med Google Scholar Crossref Foshee VA, Reyes HLM, Gottfredson NC, Chang LY, Ennett ST. Pub Med Google Scholar Crossref Bonomi AE, Anderson ML, Nemeth J, Bartle-Haring S, Buettner C, Schipper D. Pub Med Google Scholar Crossref Swahn MH, Simon TR, Arias I, Bossarte RM. Pub Med Google Scholar Crossref Foshee VA, Bauman KE, Arriaga XB, Helms RW, Koch GG, Linder GF. Pub Med Google Scholar Crossref Jouriles EN, Garrido E, Rosenfield D, Mc Donald R. Pub Med Google Scholar Crossref Wolfe DA, Scott K, Reitzel-Jaffe D, Wekerle C, Grasley C, Straatman AL. Pub Med Google Scholar Crossref Vagi KJ, Rothman EF, Latzman NE, Tharp AT, Hall DM, Breiding MJ. Pub Med Google Scholar Crossref Brener ND, Kann L, Shanklin S, et al; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Pub Med Google Scholar Kann L, Kinchen S, Shanklin SL, et al; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Severe dating violence and quality of life among South Carolina high school students. Estimating model-adjusted risks, risk differences, and risk ratios from complex survey data. Partner violence among adolescents in opposite-sex romantic relationships: findings from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Typologies of adolescent dating violence: identifying typologies of adolescent dating violence perpetration. A longitudinal examination of psychological, behavioral, academic, and relationship consequences of dating abuse victimization among a primarily rural sample of adolescents. Trends in High School Dropout and Completion Rates in the United States: 1972-2009.

Dating violence against adolescent girls and associated substance use, unhealthy weight control, sexual risk behavior, pregnancy, and suicidality. Dating violence among urban, minority, middle school youth and associated sexual risk behaviors and substance use. A longitudinal examination of psychological, behavioral, academic, and relationship consequences of dating abuse victimization among a primarily rural sample of adolescents. Dating violence victimization across the teen years: abuse frequency, number of abusive partners, and age at first occurrence. Measuring sex differences in violence victimization and perpetration within date and same-sex peer relationships. An evaluation of Safe Dates, an adolescent dating violence prevention program. Experiences of psychological and physical aggression in adolescent romantic relationships: links to psychological distress. Development and validation of the conflict in adolescent dating relationships inventory. Beyond correlates: a review of risk and protective factors for adolescent dating violence perpetration. Methodology of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System—2013. Youth risk behavior surveillance—United States, 2013. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics; 2013.The literature on IPV among adolescents indicates that the rates are similar for the number of girls and boys in heterosexual relationships who report experiencing IPV, or that girls in heterosexual relationships are more likely than their male counterparts to report perpetrating IPV. stated that, unlike domestic violence in general, equal rates of IPV perpetration is a unique characteristic with regard adolescent dating violence, and that this is "perhaps because the period of adolescence, a special developmental state, is accompanied by sexual characteristics that are distinctly different from the characteristics of adult." Wekerle and Wolfe theorized that "a mutually coercive and violent dynamic may form during adolescence, a time when males and females are more equal on a physical level" and that this "physical equality allows girls to assert more power through physical violence than is possible for an adult female attacked by a fully physically mature man." Regarding studies that indicate that girls are as likely or more likely than boys to commit IPV, the authors emphasize that substantial differences exist between the genders, including that girls are significantly more likely than boys to report having experienced severe IPV, such as being threatened with a weapon, punched, strangled, beaten, burned, or raped, and are also substantially more likely than boys to need psychological help or experience physical injuries that require medical help for the abuse, and to report sexual violence as a part of dating violence.They are also more likely to take IPV more seriously.A study published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health examined the potential association between a spectrum of childhood adverse experiences and physical violence in relationships before age 21 for both members.The subjects were asked questions about violence in their adolescent relationships, as either victim or perpetrator, and their childhood surrounding twelve different adversities: parental death, parental divorce, long-term separation from parent, parental mental illness, parental substance abuse disorder, parental criminality, inter-parental violence, serious physical illness in childhood, physical abuse, sexual abuse, neglect, and family economic adversity.

Leave a Reply

  1. inconsistent fico line item data for updating 13-May-2020 14:14

    Their model escorts include career girls and college students that are able to provide a high class experience.

  2. Videos teen cam 3g onlinee 11-Mar-2020 01:13

    You can also suggestions to our moderator concerning of transgenders and trannies you’d like to read about on our pages.

Hot chat lines always free