Dating other religions

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Racial and ethnic minorities now make up 41% of Catholics (up from 35% in 2007), 24% of evangelical Protestants (up from 19%) and 14% of mainline Protestants (up from 9%).

Religious intermarriage also appears to be on the rise: Among Americans who have gotten married since 2010, nearly four-in-ten (39%) report that they are in religiously mixed marriages, compared with 19% among those who got married before 1960.

(Explore the data with our interactive database tool.) To be sure, the United States remains home to more Christians than any other country in the world, and a large majority of Americans – roughly seven-in-ten – continue to identify with some branch of the Christian faith.

But the major new survey of more than 35,000 Americans by the Pew Research Center finds that the percentage of adults (ages 18 and older) who describe themselves as Christians has dropped by nearly eight percentage points in just seven years, from 78.4% in an equally massive Pew Research survey in 2007 to 70.6% in 2014.

The same trends are seen among whites, blacks and Latinos; among both college graduates and adults with only a high school education; and among women as well as men.

While the drop in Christian affiliation is particularly pronounced among young adults, it is occurring among Americans of all ages.

For more on how Protestant respondents were grouped into particular religious traditions, see Appendix B. adult population grew by about 18 million people, to nearly 245 million.

Nearly one-in-five people surveyed who got married since 2010 are either religiously unaffiliated respondents who married a Christian spouse or Christians who married an unaffiliated spouse.

These are among the key findings of the Pew Research Center’s second U. Religious Landscape Study, a follow-up to its first comprehensive study of religion in America, conducted in 2007. Comparing two virtually identical surveys, conducted seven years apart, can bring important trends into sharp relief.

In addition, the very large samples in both 20 included hundreds of interviews with people from small religious groups that account for just 1% or 2% of the U. population, such as Mormons, Episcopalians and Seventh-day Adventists.

Moreover, these changes are taking place across the religious landscape, affecting all regions of the country and many demographic groups.

adults who do not identify with any organized religion is growing, according to an extensive new survey by the Pew Research Center.

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